Skip to main content

Ric Orlando's Chicken and Sausage jambalaya


With Mardi Gras right around the corner, her is a simple family sized jambalaya recipe to keep them all fortified while partying!

Creole Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya
This is a slowly cooked, dark and earthy, OMG delish stew, the real deal, baby!
 It uses chicken as a base, but you can also add other stuff like duck, ham, shrimp, leftovers...you name it.

Makes enough for 4 to eat twice at least


3 lbs natural or local chicken or chicken thighs
2 bayleaves
2 springs thyme
1 tsp black peppercorns
Vegetable oil, or bacon fat, pork fat, duck fat...no need for olive oil here
1 pound andouille sausage, sliced
6 cups of the  TRINITY (That’s two cups  each of medium dice  bell peppers, celery and onion)
1/2 cups scallions. chopped
1/2 cups parsley, chopped
2 tbls Cajun seasoning mix
1 tbls dry thyme
6 cups chicken cooking liquid (see below)
4 cups tomato juice

6 cups long grain white
tabasco
worcestershire
more parsley and scallions for garnish


The chicken braising will take at least 45 minutes, so make time!
Put the chicken thighs, bay leaves, thyme and peppercorns in a pot. Cover with lightly salted water. Taste the water first. It should not be as salty as the sea, but mildly salty like a very light broth. Bring to a boil . Skim any scum that may accumulate. Once it boils, reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer for 30-40  minutes or until the chicken is fully cooked. Let the chicken cool in the broth for a few minutes. Strain. Reserve the broth and the bird separately.  
Once cooled, pull all of the meat from the chicken and roughly chop.  Set aside.

In a heavy casserole pan, add the sausage and lightly brown in a little bit of veg oil.
Add the trinity and wilt until soft but not brown.
 Add the Cajun seasoning and cook in for a minute.
Add the scallions, herbs, rice and stir well to coat with the juices in the pot.
And the chicken meat, dry thyme and Cajun seasoning and stir to coat.
 Cook a few minutes and then add tomato juice and reserved chicken broth. Bring to a boil. Once boiling reduce the heat to a low simmer and cover tightly.
Allow to simmer for about 30 minutes, then turn off the heat but leave it covered for a few more minutes to “simmer down”.  
Pick up the palate by adding dashes of Worcestershire and Tabasco to taste.
Serve garnished with chopped scallions and with hot sauce on the side

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Ric Orlando's Vegetarian Eggplant Balls (Standard and Gluten Free Versions)

Ric Orlando's Vegetarian Eggplant Balls (Standard and Gluten Free Versions)
Wow. These eggplant balls were chosen to represent the Berkshire/Hudson/Capital/Central NY area in the US Foods Next Top Product contest!

They are very old school, much the same as my mother's–and her mother's–bready Neapolitan meatballs. Braise them in simple red sauce with pasta, make a sub with lots of mozz, slice them onto pizza or salad, served with tzatziki...the possibilities are endless!

(Oh yes, and want them gluten free? We got you! Just use Gluten Free Crumbs)

Makes about 24 delectable eggplant balls

2 tablespoons salt
4 large eggplants , peeled, stem removed,  and cut into quarters lengthwise
2 cups panko bread crumbs or more if needed
2 eggs
1/2 cup  grated Pecorino romano cheese
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 bunch Italian parsley, chopped to yield 1/4 cup
2 tsp dry oregano
pinch crushed red pepper to taste
1/2 cup sunflower or other neutral flavoredvegetable oil.

Bring 8 quarts of water to a…

A Fine Corned Beef done correctly...in a bit of a brogue

Here is MY fine recipe in detail for cooking corned beef and cabbage---

Aye, As told by me to you, with hopes that you will tell your best version of this tale again to be carried on for as long as it can travel---

I. SELECTING THE MEAT
Buy a nice slab o' brisket or ready corned beef brisket form a butcher of fine repute and deriving from a cow also of fine repute.
And mark my words, Brisket means brisket here--the bottom round and other "corned beef cuts" are as counterfeit as the Queen's crown---
and nice meaning not too trimmed, retaining both the "flat" and the “nose". Make sure it has enough fat between the layers. A finger’s worth is right. Less and you will have a dry brisket. The fat is as important here as it is to a young lass seeking her prince. A little bit o’ fat will maintain the experience tender, and as she grows older, she will still be something to be desired. I am referring to that fine brisket here, now keep your devilish…

Ric Orlando's Latkes that Beat Bobby Flay!!!!!

Here they are! Ric Orlando's Luscious Latkes featured on BEAT BOBBY FLAY!!! And they WON!!

Potato Latkes, or Ashkenazi style potato pancakes, are a staple in most Jewish American households. So, this Italian chef is going to teach you how to make these amazing latkes! Got a problem with dat?I have had many a latke that has all of the traditional flavors of the classic, but were either too greasy, too rubbery or just flat. Tradition can use some technical assistance sometimes and here is my shot at it.

One of my secrets in grating the potatoes two ways.The classic regular box-grated potatoes give you the creaminess and the French style “mandolined” potatoes add a lacy, crisp componentthat makes them addictive. Also, check out the tossing technique and the incorporation of the potato liquid…read on cynics…! 
Makes 12 nice-sized latkes

8 medium-large russet potatoes, peeled 1-2 medium onions, peeled 2 tablespoons horseradish 3 eggs about ¾ cup cornstarch or potato starch as needed (for glut…