Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from 2014

Ric Orlando's Luscious Lacy Gluten Free Latke recipe

Here they are! The Luscious Latkes featured on BEAT BOOBY FLAY!!! And the WON!!

Potato Latkes, or Ashkenazi style potato pancakes, are a staple in most Jewish American households. So, this Italian chef is going to teach you how to make these amazing latkes! Got a problem with dat?I have had many a latke that has all of the traditional flavors of the classic, but were either too greasy, too rubbery or just flat. Tradition can use some technical assistance sometimes and here is my shot at it.

One of my secrets in grating the potatoes two ways.The classic regular box-grated potatoes give you the creaminess and the French style “mandolined” potatoes add a lacy, crisp componentthat makes them addictive. Also, check out the tossing technique and the incorporation of the potato liquid…read on cynics…! 
Makes 12 nice-sized latkes

8 medium-large russet potatoes, peeled 1-2 medium onions, peeled 2 tablespoons horseradish 3 eggs about ¾ cup cornstarch or potato starch as needed (for gluten-free latkes)…

Ric Orlando's Gluten Free Holiday Dessert Recipe... FLAN!

It's Holiday time! And you need to bring something to the table that is impressive, but simple to make and easy to ack and transfer.  Once this is cold, wrap the dish in foil, and pack a serving platter, a little take out container of whipped cream and diced mangos and you are set.  When you do the "flip" from the pie tin to the serving platter, you AND your dish will get attention! A good, simple flan is a perfect dessert after an holiday pig out! This is an easy,delish recipe that utilizes evaporated milk. Why? Traditionally canned milk was the milk of choice in the island where refrigeration and proper packaging storing was not reliable and when you taste this flan, it will be very apparent that this THE milk to use. 
1 cup cane sugar / split ¼ cup water 2 cups evaporated milk 4 large (local cage free) eggs plus one yolk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Pinch of salt 1 9 inch pie tin ( glass or ceramic is best) Preheat oven to 350°F.

Tomatoes are Trending at Mohonk Mountain House Hudson Valley Harvest Festival

Tomato Time in the Hud-Val by Ric Orlando!We just nipped it! Mid-September in the Hudson Valley is when the last of the tomatoes are just about to fade from sight... but we got some! 

Here are my recipes from the Hudson Valley Harvest Weekend at Mohonk Mountain House. I present a veggie specific demo here for this fest every year, and this year, tomatoes it is.
First installment: Tomato Bouillon and Tomato Sorbet!

The bouillon can be eaten a lot of ways:
Try is simply hot, garnished with herbs
Use it as a broth for tortellini or little ravioli, or with orzo or tubetti and Romano cheese
Poach lobster, scallops or shrimp in it (gently!)
Freeze it into ice cubes and drop them in Bloody Marys, martinis, gin-and-tonics, and more.

This is a fabulous way to use up the inexpensive, end-of-season, cracked, ripe canning tomatoes.




Harvest Tomato Bouillon Since Campbell’s has defined our American concept of tomato soup, I have designed a cleaner and lighter version that captures all of the beautiful …

Ric Orlando's Summer BBQ Clams

BBQ Clams on the half shell
After a long Hudson Valley summer day, it's time for dinner on the deck. 'Nuff said.
One of my fave dishes ever is simple BBQ clams on the half shell. They take twice as long to prep as they do to eat but it is worth every second. I have had parties where I am shucking for hours while my guests are slurping up hot, buttery, spicy clams faster than I can cook them!

So here is where to start:
Get some fresh littlenecks. Nothing else will do.
Maine clams? Cheap yes, but they suck.
Cherrystones? Too big.
Go with Rhode Island or Long Island Littlenecks. Trust me.

Shuck them first, just like for clams on the regular-old half shell. (Don't cheat and steam them open or you will not have the same dish!)
Need some shucking help? Instead of me showing you, here is Rich Vallante, Legal Seafood's executive chef doing a quick shucking video.



Ingredients (serves 2-4)

36 Rhode Island Littlenecks
1/4 lb excellent butter
salt
choice of hot sauces

First thing …

Take It Easy on the Spring Ramps and Fiddleheads

Back in my early days of cheffing–in the mid-late 1980s–there were only a few of us who foraged and bought food from foragers to prepare in our commercial kitchens. We were a colorful club: mostly foreigners, sons and daughters of foreigners, or offbeat chefs like me who read and learned of such treasures in well worn books like Gastronomique, James Beard's American Cookery, Fanny Farmer, Ma Cuisine...

Fast forward 30 years. Now foraging is fashion and every chef worth his cool in every city NEEDS ramps and fiddleheads. So PLEASE abide by these guidelines, or you will be part of wiping them all out!

Don't over harvest. We need this year's plants to make next year's harvest! With ramps, pull no more than 25% of what you find. If you want to use the greens and pink stem, you can clip up to 75%, but always leave a lot behind to propagate. If you are just a buyer and not a forager, ASK YOUR FORAGER if they are harvesting sustainably or raping the woods. Sounds ugly, right?…

Please Don't Compare an Indie Craft Restaurant Burger with a Chain Burger

Reality bites: You get what you pay for.

PLEASE stop comparing independent craft restaurants with chain operations. Yes, the word "burger" is the same, but you are getting two very different products.

Here is a little insight.

BASIC CHAIN BURGERS
You pay: $8-10 Burger
Meat: A GMO soy-corn-antibiotic fed, hormone-infected pattie, cooked in transfat laced "mel fry," "Kaola gold" or other GMO fake fat.
Bread: 2-oz bun, looks bigger because it is over proofed and pumped with diabetes-inducing dough conditioners, and of course, flavored with high-fructose corn syrup and plenty of preservatives.
Sides: Lettuce preserved with that sweet-smelling sodium tripolyphosphate (that's called snow white in the biz, keeps vegetables from oxidizing) and a GMO, irradiated Mexican tomato, often delivered pre-sliced by a chlorine sprayed machine in Mexico. Maybe you get a pickle; it will definitely be colored with yellow #5 and swimming in preservatives.
Fries: Frozen fries th…