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Champagne Dinner 2010 at New World

New World “Champagne” Dinner 2010
Saturday December 18th, 2010 7 pm
Reservation only 845 246 0900

2010 “Champagne” Dinner
All American Sparkling Wines
and Sustainable Seafood!

BUBBLES, USA!
I thought it would be cool to feature Sparklers from 5 different growing regions.
It is easy to do all Cali or even all Finger Lakes, but we worked to find a home for 5 completely different styles of American Sparklers on this menu. I chose to go all seafood. Each course makes the wine sing!
Hopefully we'll see ya there.

5 wines from 5 states are paired with 5 all American seafood courses.

$65
Savory Duck Egg Creme Brulee
with butter poached lobster and salmon roe
Chateau Frank Blanc de Blancs, Finger Lakes

“Seed” Crusted Diver Scallops
cauliflower two ways, smooth puree w/ Curry and Meyer lemon,
pakora fried with cilantro-mint chimi
Argyle Brut, Oregon

Cornmeal Fried Oyster Sliders, Apple Chutney,
Monkfish Liver Pate
on peppered butter biscuits with champagne mustard
Pacific Rim Sparkling Rielsing, Washin…

Menu Tweaks in Saugerties

(Small Bites: Korean Pork Belly, Potato Samosa, Mahi Ceviche and Jerk Beef and Pineapple)

WINTER 2010
Yes, It is winter in he Hudson Valley and that means slow cooking, braises and hearty stews, right?
Yes, Maybe and maybe not.
In the last two months, according to the "Product Mix" on our Point of Sale System, New World Home Cooking sold over three small plates-appetizers-sandwiches- to every one Big Main plates.
Appetizers like Mushroom-Huitlacoche Tamales, Half sized Thai Italian Bolognese Pasta, Tuna Burger Sliders, Korean Pork Belly Bites, Puerto Rican Style Seitan "Wings" and Sicilian Pumpkin Fritters are leading the way in sales. We are eating smaller bites and bigger tastes, for sure. The sales are telling the truth,
So, I have done some menu tweaking based upon your eating habits and the results are more small plates and appetizers actually!
Now I know the math is somewhat skewed because people often order numerous small plates "for the table" but it …

Repost by request

Foodie Weekend in NYC It is OUR birthday weekend-- Liz and I are both October 28th and our sons, Willis and Terrence are October 27th.This year is Lizzie's 50th so we decided to spend in the NYC for some foodie fun with our best friends!We have GREAT foodie friends so off we went.
Here is my rant and summary--Friday night with our best friends to a classic brasserie- They are GREAT dining companions who are world travelers. They know that Liz and I love a good brasserie - they type of dinner that should be a no bullshit, filling and unpretentious experience. Well, I guess I missed the NY revolution- brasseries gone minimalist--how sad. The food presentation here was VERY precious and pretentious. Not bad, mind you, but what is the deal with Austere and Brasserie in the same sentence. Brasserie means working man's establishment. Any self respecting workingman would beat the tar out of this chef!1. Steak frites with Maitre D'hotel butter. No brainer--Liz loves …

Sunday

When did the natives invent such loud drums?
It is Sunday morning and my FACEBOOK pages are belching with comments.
It is a fascinating development for we humans. We can communicate, and either hope for a response, or hope NOT for a response without being face to face with anyone who would otherwise blow gray smoke on our beautiful crystalline picture window. It is a very tricky step in our method of howling. Have you ever been at a party and tried to get a subject of conversation started to no avail? Every time you bring your precious pet issue up in a circle, someone interrupts with a funnier story or some breaking news about a local artist's ex wife?
Well, post your comment on facebook. If you have enough friends or "likes" there is bound to be one or two who will "support" you. "You are awesome" is my favorite. Awesome is a potent word. It implies to power to inspire AWE.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/awesome
You made it through enough da…

Form - Afterhours

Thanksgiving Help II, Pie Shells

And is it a sin to buy a pre-made pie crust?Yes...and no...It is never a sin to buy whatever you want. It's your hell, we don't share in that. My only issue with premade pie shells is the use of PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OIL.Now, it is only one day and you'll only have one slice ( right?) so I suppose you will survive but I'll bet you'll get heartburn and that may cast a dark shadow on an otherwise fabulous day. You may actually blame your cousin's delicious cranberry-chipotle compote for the heart burn when the real culprit is the PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OIL. This may create a long term family rift. And we don't want that.The sales of antacids and the consumption of PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OIL coincide perfectly. The stuff is not digestible. A classic and perfect pie crust is made with lard. Yes lard. Look it up. There is no better method. The flakiness and crispness are perfect. Great people who have lived fabulous lives and have…

Thanksgiving Questions? Answered!

For the next few days, I'll post some questions posed to me by Megan, a reporter for Ulster Publishing, and my answers of course, about Thanksgiving food, cooking and the general stress and madness associated with our greatest feast day.
Enjoy!

Let's talk Triage--Tell us how to save a turkey from the brink of inedibility?

Turkey is a tricky one--it is really hard to WRECK turkey unless it is
a. raw or
b. burnt.(Visit my website http://www.ricorlando.com/turkey101.html for a flawless turkey cooking technique)
So if the turkey is raw---open another bottle of wine and have another canape or six while you wait. This always works.If it is really, really raw, have some pumpkin pie and have turkey later.If it is overcooked, or burnt, there is only one way out--more gravy! Gravy is the panacea of many an overlooked beast. Really, though, if the turkey is not cooking to your dinner timing, here are a few tips.1. Remove the legs and thighs from the bird. They cook much slower than the breast …

NY Wines on the Horizon

We drank all of the Finger Lakes Lamoreaux Landing Pinot last night at the bar with friends, don't want to "Bait and Switch"! There will be more in by Wednesday!This wine is delicious! It has the prefect balance between a Burgundian Pinot's soft yet inviting perfumed fruit and a Willamette's bright and cheery cherry bomb--and though it has bright edge, it is not nearly as acidic the much bracing acidity makes for an almost unripe, rhubarby attack.
Go Finger Lakes!
The serious wineries are getting it right! It's it time to appreciate the wineries that re not trying to be something they are not. There are many Fingerlakes and Hudson Valley wines that are FINALLY understanding that you can be a perfect reflection of the region's terrior and make delicious wine.
Fading away are the days of blending and concocting hybrids to release a "merlot that tastes like a California merlot".
NY Wines have a style all their own, and like a commune in Fran…

Birthday weekend in NY - Eataly and more...

2010Foodie Weekend in NYC It is OUR birthday weekend-- Liz and I are both October 28th and our sons, Willis and Terrence are October 27th.This year is Lizzie's 50th so we decided to spend in the NYC for some foodie fun with our best friends!We have GREAT foodie friends so off we went.
Here is my rant and summary--Friday night with our best friends to a classic brasserie- They are GREAT dining companions who are world travelers. They know that Liz and I love a good brasserie - they type of dinner that should be a no bullshit, filling and unpretentious experience. Well, I guess I missed the NY revolution- brasseries gone minimalist--how sad. The food presentation here was VERY precious and pretentious. Not bad, mind you, but what is the deal with Austere and Brasserie in the same sentence. Brasserie means working man's establishment. Any self respecting workingman would beat the tar out of this chef!1. Steak frites with Maitre D'hotel butter. No brainer--Liz loves a go…
Reposted - originally from 2006, but it's time to repost!

My Views on the Sustainable-Organic-Local Food Issue from a restauranteur's perspective.

Ah, Marketing, Marketing...everybody wants to be on the right side of the consumer's conscience these days. So, how does it feel to be a consumer? Do you feel---Confused? Guilty? Perplexed? Bombarded? Folks, let me tell you that as a chef the simple notion of buying clean food is frighteningly complex! The complexity has increased tenfold over the last five years. Sourcing real food---unprocessed, that is---is a full time effort.
We chefs are approached by waves of salespeople---some innocent though ignorant and some bordering on diabolical---with hundreds of "Money Saving" or "Value Added" items. When the name of the game is survival, many restaurant operators are blinded by the initial price of the food they purchase. The industry press has us all in a state of fear, and for the uninformed operator…

Ric Orlando's Global Pumpkin Recipes (with Gluten Free and Vegan Options!)

Hey everyone! Didja get your Pumpkins for carving yet?

In the words of our elders who were around during the depression: Waste not, want not.

Don't throw the guts and the pieces you carved out away just yet! All of the pumpkin "guts" (seeds and membranes) can get made into stock and roasted pumpkin seeds, and the eyes, noses, ears and grins that are cut out of the pumpkin are good edible stuff, too.

When I was a  kid, I remember "Little Nonni"–my father's mother Mary– and all 4'9" of her stoic Sicilian self taking the pieces of pumpkin face that we kids were cutting out from the newspapered floor. In a few minutes there was golden breaded and fried chunks of pumpkin on a field of warm tomato sauce, blanketed by a snow of grated Romano cheese, and ready to eat.

I have recreated that simple recipe and have added three more–goin' round the world, using pumpkin as the centerpiece of these recipes. 

Enjoy!

Pumpkin Stock Remove the membranes and seeds from…

Brussel Sprouts: A Trio of Recipes

Brussels sprouts are one of those kitchen items, like anchovies, fish sauce and cilantro, that conjure strong feelings on both sides of the aisle. When I was growing up in the '60s, I hated them. We didn't have them often, but like Lima beans, when we saw them on our nightly blue plate, they sent waves of dread through the souls of my little sister and me. They were always cooked from frozen until soft and mushy, buttered, salted and that's it. I am now enlightened! Properly cooked Brussels sprouts are an autumn treat. I have taught my kids to get excited about them, and when purchased from a farm stand on a stalk, they are often the star of the meal!

Remember that strong and bitter green vegetables can handle more salt than delicate veggies. This trio of recipes really showcases that.

Garlic Walnut Brussels Sprouts
This dish used quartered sprouts with lots of garlic. This gives them a balanced, firm-yet-tender texture. They are great with pork and rich skin on poultry prep…
Summer Salsa recioes posted on my pal Dakota Lanes Blog

http://dakotalane.blogspot.com/2009/11/ric-orlandos-salsa-recipes.html

Road Trip 2010- Day Two

Father’s Day Brunch in Chinatown, San Francisco


Dim Sum


The question of the morning: Should we go to the place with the best food or should we go for the most genuine 'Dim Sum' experience?

Only time would tell. We read reviews and blogs online about various places- most of which were not in Chinatown- but we wanted to be in the magic of Chinatown.

San Francisco’s Chinatown is the oldest in America and has many nostalgic remnants. Along with its Maltese Falcon, Dirty Harry, Fire of ’06 and Barbary Coast romanticism, San Francisco has a love affair with its old Chinatown.
I love it, and wanted my sons to experience it through my old Charlie Chan experienced eyes.

After pondering the validity of the internet reviews we decided upon a place call Hang Ah Dim Sum and Tea Room. It opened in 1920 and, according to the many spirited readers in Chow Hound, was the most was “authentic” of the Chinatown Dim Sum houses.
Okay- Hang Ah Dim Sum here we come!




Oh-no-- we were still on East Coast t…